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Cardiology Quality Improvement Report – Cholesterol Management

ADC Cardiology Quality Chart Comparing ADC to national data 2013

Cholesterol Screen – Percentage of patients 18 to 75 years of age with CAD who were discharged for acute MI, who have a documented LDL result within 12 months

Cholesterol Control – Percentage of patients 18 to 75 years of age with CAD who were discharged for acute MI, who have a documented LDL result within 12 months that was

About this quality report

High cholesterol is associated with elevated levels of LDL-C (“bad cholesterol”). A person with a serum total cholesterol of 240 mg/dL or greater is considered to have high cholesterol.  There are 33.6 million American adults at or above this threshold. High cholesterol causes fatty deposits to adhere to artery walls and impedes blood flow.  There are no signs or symptoms of high cholesterol, which increases a person’s risk for heart failure or stroke due to reduced blood flow to the heart and brain.

High cholesterol is often a silent threat  to health and increases the risk of poor cardiovascular health. If cholesterol is monitored and reduced, it is possible to lower the risk of stroke or heart attack.

The most recent report in July 2012 shows The Austin Diagnostic Clinic Cardiology patients exceed the national average in both performing cholesterol screenings and keeping their cholesterol levels in control.

This report looks at how ADC doctors are screening for cholesterol and whether patients are controlling their cholesterol.

What you can do

Speak with your Primary Care Physician about routine cholesterol checks.  Most people are recommended to have a cholesterol test every 5 years.  If you have cardiovascular disease, you should visit a Cardiologist and have your cholesterol checked at least once per year.  Incorporating needed lifestyle and diet changes, in addition to necessary medications, is key to lowering cholesterol and improving health outcomes.